With 14 confirmed cases of the Covid-19 virus, are we next?

Covid-19, a virus that sometimes causes flu-like symptoms but is one of a handful of “bacteriophages” that target viruses from other species, has been in the news lately. CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said…

With 14 confirmed cases of the Covid-19 virus, are we next?

Covid-19, a virus that sometimes causes flu-like symptoms but is one of a handful of “bacteriophages” that target viruses from other species, has been in the news lately.

CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said this week in testimony to Congress that federal health officials were “pleased” that they are “beginning to understand” the spread of the virus, which has been found in 21 people so far, mostly people who returned from an area with pandemic flu. All but two of the people were from the state of Indiana. Fitzgerald also said the CDC was “challenging” the state health departments of Indiana and Iowa to identify the health care providers in their states, and identify additional patients who came in contact with infected people.

As of Nov. 30, the most recent date on which data is available, about 5,000 of the virus’s six known strains have been reported to CDC. We’ve put together a list of the most recent ones in the US and overseas.

Most of the cases have occurred in North America. The CDC has said only 12 percent of infected people show any symptoms of the virus, which is spread through respiratory droplets spread in the air.

Here’s a map with links to data from the CDC and our colleague. Some of the states had multiple cases. And it’s also important to note that some states had a higher proportion of cases than others. But even among states that had the fewest cases, “about 30 percent of cases were in people with mild symptoms, while less than 6 percent were severe,” according to CDC’s Fact Sheet.

There have been 54 human cases reported in the US. Twelve have died. There are about 26,000 cases reported in the US each year, according to the CDC.

Meanwhile, a few facts about the virus.

Sightings are most common in people who live in cities or urban areas and were in close proximity to a sick person who had the virus.

The virus is likely to be “more common than other early-stage viruses because of its ability to survive outside the respiratory tract, and its ability to transmit between people.”

Unlike a flu, it can’t be spread easily from person to person, only from person to person. But it can still be passed on from one person to another, and can cause flu-like symptoms in those infected.

About 48 percent of the cases of the virus reported so far have been reported in the southern region of the US, and 39 percent in the northern region.

And then there are the viruses.

The CDC has one other coronavirus on record. The CDC classifies an H1N1 virus as having two strains of the virus. The H1N1 virus H1N1 (swine flu) was a strain that circulated from 2009 to 2012. The 2014 to 2015 virus, H3N2 virus (flu) was also a strain that circulated in 2009 to 2012, and is related to the 2009 swine flu virus H1N1. H5N1 virus, which is named after the region where it was first detected in 1957, is a virus that circulates in Indonesia and in Asia.

This post was originally published in November. It has been updated to include data on the US cases.

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