What made Media Matters call out the host of CNN’s Reliable Sources show

CNN, who has been running the event for years, was not told when it was happening and didn’t know there was a venue change at the last minute. CNN’s“Reliable Sources” also wasn’t informed. For…

What made Media Matters call out the host of CNN’s Reliable Sources show

CNN, who has been running the event for years, was not told when it was happening and didn’t know there was a venue change at the last minute. CNN’s“Reliable Sources” also wasn’t informed.

For those who aren’t familiar with this show, it was on set to be the “token and average” guy who contributes to the show. For the record, I’m not. I don’t know whether I’m average, token or average. I’m just as happy as the next guy to do the job.

However, I’m big enough to stand in line behind an industry insider, who happens to be an insider, and I can tell you with certainty that he was the guy running the show. That’s why the microphone wasn’t on.

This is what I like to call some “rhetorical investing.” For a guy who has made his name by walking the walk and talking the talk, I’m never more interested in a speaker’s words than when I hear them actually said, instead of just promised.

People always ask me about the old saying about not criticizing a book before reading it. When I say, “I don’t read out of honor,” I mean this. I just don’t like. I find it far more interesting to own up to my own mistakes, and often to do so while sitting in a room where the leader is just there to hear the whole shit talk.

A guest will introduce himself or herself with a speech, usually one we’ve already written for the show and they just updated their copy. They will say a phrase that typically attracts our attention and we are left to judge whether the presenters are up to the mark.

Recently, a young woman introduced herself as “Doug Ford’s new policy advisor.” I wasn’t sure I was in the audience of an academy for automotive engineering, but hey, let’s give her a shot.

What she had to say was entertaining and quite informative. She praised Ontario’s skilled immigrants and then, in a nice bow to the people of Ontario, said that all skilled immigrants needed to learn English and follow the rules of the land.

After the speech, we met for a couple of minutes. We sat down in a small room, and I asked if there was anything specific she wanted to say that hadn’t been said. She said she was so in awe of Ford, that I should actually leave the audience to “screen” her remarks.

She said that in her conversation with him, Doug had talked about taking the initiative and making a big deal out of Ontario’s economic success with skilled immigrants. She said that if she had a year, she would teach people in the province how to learn English and how to live like immigrants.

I left, having witnessed a warm moment that did not require a podium.

Finally, the next day I asked at my home office in Brooklyn whether the fact that he had left a big part of the audience in the dark last night had left a negative impression.

It really did. The evening made it clear, and I’m not sure the audience even wanted to know it, that we are not a professional show. We can’t do an interview with a special guest unless they call us in advance and make every effort to share the news from the stage.

There were no cameras on camera or even in the room as Doug said what everyone thought was good. I like that.

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