Marie-Jose Sarcos: Everyday Life Featured in The Rise of Surrealism

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip. Think you know everything about surrealism? You may be surprised. Marie-Jose Sarcos, Director of the Center for Magical Thinking at the Feinstein Art & Film Center, joined…

Marie-Jose Sarcos: Everyday Life Featured in The Rise of Surrealism

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Think you know everything about surrealism? You may be surprised.

Marie-Jose Sarcos, Director of the Center for Magical Thinking at the Feinstein Art & Film Center, joined the Brian Kilmeade Show to explain the rise of surrealism and how it played an influential role in changing our cultural perception of art and reality. Sarcos said that the source material for surrealism was fiction.

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Sarcos said that the center first began to deal with more of a theoretical and analytical take on the works of surrealism. The center’s exhibition at the Feinstein Art & Film Center titled “Mourners” uses works of Francisco Goya, Henri Matisse, Agnes Martin, and Robert Delaunay to explore the idea of the tragic figure, described by Sarcos as “a person that goes from believing everything to not believing anything.” Sarcos said the center tries to be able to give each of the exhibition’s more than 80 paintings and sculptures a context within a museum gallery.

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You might not have any idea where you’ve seen some of the works in the exhibition, or by the way, you might like them. In these rare scenes, you can see a somber-minded everyday man dealing with the aftermath of the World War I through images of a German school being demolished and an abandoned factory in decline, as well as an overly friendly chef giving a troubled child a helping hand. You will never see a more charming little girl, smilingly kissing her slightly shaven head again – after her parents were tortured to death by the Russian secret police.

The Great Grandmother in Aneliesse has the same gray hair, the same elegant fashion and even has the same eyebrows. She lived in the pre-war years and enjoys swimming in her boat, playing with her grandchildren, and playing with toys. Her lovers are different, older men who, she said, could never be her sons because, “My children would have died.” Eventually, she settled down with a German scientist named Arturo the Terror. She proposed to him, and in her attempts to entice him she said: “All I want is to marry you, a man of my time. I’m simply, alone without a partner.” Her house was haunted. Her son, Guy, was murdered by Japanese soldiers in a uranium mine in Algeria. His body was found in a ditch, his body holding five bullets in his head and an embossed “bon” on his torso.

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