Group of hikers face steep climb and treacherous conditions trying to reach remote Yosemite

(FOX 13 Sacramento) – An old burned-out vehicle and some food. That’s all a group of hikers had to stay going when their journey from Big Sur to nearby Yosemite National Park went bad….

Group of hikers face steep climb and treacherous conditions trying to reach remote Yosemite

(FOX 13 Sacramento) – An old burned-out vehicle and some food. That’s all a group of hikers had to stay going when their journey from Big Sur to nearby Yosemite National Park went bad.

They had lost their car keys on the rugged trail, but figured they would be okay as long as they had enough provisions.

Two days later, Jordan Gould and 11 of his fellow hikers had reached a piece of Tuolumne River rock that was more than a thousand feet deep. But instead of calling the authorities for help, they decided to walk off. They carried packs over their shoulders and crossed back and forth, a dangerous endeavor on Yosemite’s intense slopes. They decided to search for help on the riverbeds on either side of their gravely cliff. No river runs over the gorge they struggled to get over.

At night, they knew they needed to situate themselves higher.

But at the last possible moment, they underestimated Yosemite’s steep and dangerous granite peaks. Gould and his group had to scale one peak and fall down on another. A huge vertical drop off of nearly 360 degrees caused their two thin ice axes to break and their climbing-over boots to melt. They laid there for two hours without food, water or a map. In the frigid, wind-chilled night they sang songs for 20 minutes, searching for reassurance.

When they saw a big boulder and got out of the freezing water and started walking uphill, their first stop was at a remote location. Despite most of the other hikers’ cell phone service, Gould had no way to find anybody. He was covered in snow and misery.

(FOX 13 Sacramento) – An old burned-out vehicle and some food. That’s all a group of hikers had to stay going when their journey from Big Sur to nearby Yosemite National Park went bad.

They had lost their car keys on the rugged trail, but figured they would be okay as long as they had enough provisions.

Two days later, Jordan Gould and 11 of his fellow hikers had reached a piece of Tuolumne River rock that was more than a thousand feet deep. But instead of calling the authorities for help, they decided to walk off. They carried packs over their shoulders and crossed back and forth, a dangerous endeavor on Yosemite’s intense slopes. They decided to search for help on the riverbeds on either side of their gravely cliff. No river runs over the gorge they struggled to get over.

At night, they knew they needed to situate themselves higher.

But at the last possible moment, they underestimated Yosemite’s steep and dangerous granite peaks. Gould and his group had to scale one peak and fall down on another. A huge vertical drop off of nearly 360 degrees caused their two thin ice axes to break and their climbing-over boots to melt. They laid there for two hours without food, water or a map. In the frigid, wind-chilled night they sang songs for 20 minutes, searching for reassurance.

When they saw a big boulder and got out of the freezing water and started walking uphill, their first stop was at a remote location. Despite most of the other hikers’ cell phone service, Gould had no way to find anybody. He was covered in snow and misery.

(FOX 13 Sacramento) – An old burned-out vehicle and some food. That’s all a group of hikers had to stay going when their journey from Big Sur to nearby Yosemite National Park went bad.

They had lost their car keys on the rugged trail, but figured they would be okay as long as they had enough provisions.

Two days later, Jordan Gould and 11 of his fellow hikers had reached a piece of Tuolumne River rock that was more than a thousand feet deep. But instead of calling the authorities for help, they decided to walk off. They carried packs over their shoulders and crossed back and forth, a dangerous endeavor on Yosemite’s intense slopes. They decided to search for help on the riverbeds on either side of their gravely cliff. No river runs over the gorge they struggled to get over.

At night, they knew they needed to situate themselves higher.

But at the last possible moment, they underestimated Yosemite’s steep and dangerous granite peaks. Gould and his group had to scale one peak and fall down on another. A huge vertical drop off of nearly 360 degrees caused their two thin ice axes to break and their climbing-over boots to melt. They laid there for two hours without food, water or a map. In the frigid, wind-chilled night they sang songs for 20 minutes, searching for reassurance.

When they saw a big boulder and got out of the freezing water and started walking uphill, their first stop was at a remote location. Despite most of the other hikers’ cell phone service, Gould had no way to find anybody. He was

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