Autopsy: Hammerhead sharks likely killed slain trawler captain

DANBURY, Conn.—An autopsy on the body of Mark Andresen determined that the 36-year-old with a 100-pound hammer in the ocean likely drowned after the shark that fatally attacked him attacked him when his body…

Autopsy: Hammerhead sharks likely killed slain trawler captain

DANBURY, Conn.—An autopsy on the body of Mark Andresen determined that the 36-year-old with a 100-pound hammer in the ocean likely drowned after the shark that fatally attacked him attacked him when his body or the hammer caught on its tail, according to a report released Friday.

Andresen’s family released a statement following the release of the autopsy report by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New Haven.

“First and foremost, our dear brother, father, and friend has gone home to be with the Lord,” the statement said. “We have been humbled by the outpouring of condolences from the community and family, and for the outpouring of thanks from the community and community. We are grateful that it is a time to come together in love and shared grief.”

Andresen was paddling off a sandy beach in Hammonasset on Wednesday when a 15-foot-long shark bit his head. His body, marked with a single red, white and blue rib marking as a funeral detail, was taken to a landfill and was buried in the town.

Andresen’s sister, Christy Vogel, praised the efforts of police, a local restaurant and search and rescue teams who saved others before her brother was killed.

“On behalf of the Andresen family, we feel truly blessed that our family lost the joy of Mark’s engagement to be a husband and father, but not his spirit and his death was no fault of his own,” Vogel’s statement said. “We are equally grateful for the many organizations that contributed to help our family heal.”

The search for the shark continued on Friday and continued to be hampered by poor weather. The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection deployed a drone and three vessels, while local dive teams searched shorelines and under the Atlantic Ocean.

Environmental protection and fire department boats searched the Connecticut shorelines of East and Westport. DEC Officer Geoffrey Chambers said the state couldn’t conduct the search on the ocean, as it would destroy evidence.

Scientists are conducting necropsies to determine Andresen’s cause of death.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration removed Andresen’s name from a shark advisory issued for the area, though officials said Andresen was not specifically singled out. Andresen’s head and entrails, head and hands, along with a large part of his lower right torso, could be found in the water.

The statement said a family friend has started a crowdfunding page to help pay for Andresen’s funeral.

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